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TO   THE   LIGHTHOUSE

without looking round, that every one at the table
was listening to the voice saying:

I wonder if it seems to you
Luriana, Lurilee

with the same sort of relief and pleasure that she
had, as if this were, at last, the natural thing to
say, this were their own voice speaking.

But the voice stopped. She looked round.
She made herself get up. Augustus Carmichael
had risen and, holding his table napkin so that it
looked like a long white robe he stood chanting:

To see the Kings go riding by
Over lawn and daisy lea
With their palm leaves and cedar sheaves,
Luriana, Lurilee,

and as she passed him he turned slightly towards
her repeating the last words:

Luriana, Lurilee,

and bowed to her as if he did her homage.
Without knowing why, she felt that he liked her
better than he had ever done before; and with a
feeling of relief and gratitude she returned his
bow and passed through the door which he held
open for her.

It was necessary now to carry everything a step
further. With her foot on the threshold she
waited a moment longer in a scene which was
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